127



Frances Marvin Smith Webster1848-03-01Lucien BonaparteFort McHenry, MD39.2641151-76.5798874Your last two letters, dearest husband, were received within two days of each other. I was much gratified to learn from them that you continued in good-- NA --health, and trust that the sanguine hopes of peace you express in them will be realized. But I must confess my own hopes are not so highly raised although there is certainly a better prospect of the settlement of our difficulties with Mexico than heretofore. The treaty is certainly not such a one as we have a right to demand from a prostrate foe, yet the Mexicans may not be willing to accede to the modifications which the President will be compelled to make in order to have it ratified by our Congress. I pray that it may be settled in some way or other, for if the contest is not terminated now I fear that the struggle may continue many years, and perhaps the Mexicans may be openly aided by some of the European powers.You will see by the papers I have lately sent you, and by Dix's speech 1 which I will endeavor to send you the underhanded intriguing measure the English have already made use of in order to obtain a footing in Central America, which gives a pretty strong evidence of their inclination to curtail our power as much as possible, while at the same time they stop at nothing which can extend their own domination. . . .We have heard from Uncle Edmund that he would leave the City of Mexico in the train which was to leave between the fifteenth and twentieth of February and proceed to his home with as little delay as possible. Colonel Belton also has some expectation of leaving in the March train. Uncle Edmund says speaking of brother Edmund "that he is hearty as a buck, and one of the finest fellows alive." I have seen a letter written by Lieutenant [John] Sedgwick from the City of Mexico in which he says that General Scott is very confident of peace, and says "Gentlemen, in May we'll be afloat, afloat I say" -- alluding I suppose to a homeward sail.Public sympathies here are very much in favor of General Scott. He certainly has been very hardly treated because his political opinions are not in accordance with those of the administration and of the redoubtable Mr. Polk, and Worth though known to possess no moral principle or sense of rectitude and honor but simply because he is a Democrat of the most unstable character, and a bosom friend of the Secretary of War, goes scott free, notwithstanding the serious allegations against him.I look upon him [Worth] as a base murderer. The terrible slaughter at Molino del Rey was his work. On the field of battle there he ordered the artillery to cease firing although remonstrated with at the time by his officers and ordered the infantry to the slaughter. Those who survived could not restrain their indignation and Captain Chapman of the 5th stepped up to him on the field of battle and exclaimed "Sir, you are a murderer." 2 Yet General Scott has not exposed this and other misdemeanors, and how is his lenity returned? By the most malignant ingratitude. . . .-- NA --I have seen but little of Magruder; he is lionizing most extensively about the country. He looks very well, much better than he did at Houlton.I think it more than probable that I shall join Uncle Edmund, when he comes out of Mexico, and go as far as New York. I am very glad that you have been so successful in your collection for poor Mrs. Capron. She has now received over two thousand dollars from the officers of the Army.I am obliged to conclude rather abruptly dearest husband, and I have been writing with various interruptions, as I am nursing Aunt Harriet who is quite sick and now needs my services. . . .