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Isabella Marshall Graham1773-01-31John GrahamAntiguaMY EVER DEAR DOCTOR,Your kind, your welcome letter reached me four days ago. My little friend, Mrs. Grandidier, and I were sitting over a dish of tea at Rat Island, not speaking scandal, but bewailing our unhappy fate, in being separated from all that could render life agreeable or happy, when, behold a messenger from Mr. McS --, with two letters in his hand. Mrs. G -- had nigh overset the tea-table and all the children; she got hold of them first, exclaiming, "is it possible?" "It is, it is, I know the hand," (cried I). Down we sat, and were both mute for half an hour. We were now so happy, had not the children been so clamorous I know not-- 76 --when we should have parted; but, it was now quite dark, the children almost asleep, so we tore ourselves asunder, but not for a long time. We spend three or four days in the week together; we are company for nobody else, nor is any body else company for us. We dwell on the dear subject; hob or nob to your health -- in wine, in water, in tea, -- give free scope to our tongues, communicate our fears, our hopes, our wishes, repeat the same thing ten times over, and return to our homes with our minds greatly disburthened. You would hardly believe it, but indeed Mrs. G -- is every bit as great a fool as your Bell. I would not love her half so well if she were not. We enjoy a melancholy happiness which those who never felt as we do can have no idea of. I have written twice, but I scarce know what; before the receipt of your letter I was miserable, and from such a mind nothing but confusion could proceed; besides, I was far from being well. Thank God, I am now perfectly recovered; the children are still but indifferent. Mrs. G -- and I dined once with the commanding officer; things neat, but not extravagant. Mrs. B -- and Mrs. Mo -- have been to pay their respects to Lady P --:-- 77 --my little friend and I think it our duty, but we cannot prevail upon ourselves to take the trouble.Dr. E -- and lady have arrived; she is a very pretty woman. Dr. Galloway writes to you himself, so I need say nothing of the sick.My dearest love, this far I wrote five days ago, as the sloop was expected to sail on Sunday. Mrs. Grandidier is now with me, and bids me say nothing new has happened. She sends her love to Captain G --, and her respects to you. We have made you a few biscuits to relish a glass of wine; and I beg leave to propose the toast -- "05 we have in our arms, whom we love in our hearts."By any accounts we have as yet, there seems to be little hopes of seeing you soon; we beg therefore, that if there be any thing that we could send that would make your situation more comfortable, you will let us know. Mr. McS -- has voluntarily become my agent to find me opportunities, and see any thing I send put on board, or whatever business I may have for him to do. I am going to write a few lines to Mr. A --, begging, when he has an opportunity for this place, and has no letter for me, that he will drop-- 78 --me a line communicating his last intelligence. If I can only hear that you are alive and well, it will be such a cordial to me, for O, at times, my heart forebodes such dreadful things. O, Doctor, but for the dear hope of having you one day restored to me, my life would be insupportable; how uncertain is that hope. Farewell, my love! may Heaven defend and protect you, praysYour fond and affectionate Wife,I. Graham17.083333-61.8
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MY EVER DEAR DOCTOR,Your kind, your welcome letter reached me four days ago. My little friend, Mrs. Grandidier, and I were sitting over a dish of tea at Rat Island, not speaking scandal, but bewailing our unhappy fate, in being separated from all that could render life agreeable or happy, when, behold a messenger from Mr. McS --, with two letters in his hand. Mrs. G -- had nigh overset the tea-table and all the children; she got hold of them first, exclaiming, "is it possible?" "It is, it is, I know the hand," (cried I). Down we sat, and were both mute for half an hour. We were now so happy, had not the children been so clamorous I know not-- 76 --when we should have parted; but, it was now quite dark, the children almost asleep, so we tore ourselves asunder, but not for a long time. We spend three or four days in the week together; we are company for nobody else, nor is any body else company for us. We dwell on the dear subject; hob or nob to your health -- in wine, in water, in tea, -- give free scope to our tongues, communicate our fears, our hopes, our wishes, repeat the same thing ten times over, and return to our homes with our minds greatly disburthened. You would hardly believe it, but indeed Mrs. G -- is every bit as great a fool as your Bell. I would not love her half so well if she were not. We enjoy a melancholy happiness which those who never felt as we do can have no idea of. I have written twice, but I scarce know what; before the receipt of your letter I was miserable, and from such a mind nothing but confusion could proceed; besides, I was far from being well. Thank God, I am now perfectly recovered; the children are still but indifferent. Mrs. G -- and I dined once with the commanding officer; things neat, but not extravagant. Mrs. B -- and Mrs. Mo -- have been to pay their respects to Lady P --:-- 77 --my little friend and I think it our duty, but we cannot prevail upon ourselves to take the trouble.Dr. E -- and lady have arrived; she is a very pretty woman. Dr. Galloway writes to you himself, so I need say nothing of the sick.My dearest love, this far I wrote five days ago, as the sloop was expected to sail on Sunday. Mrs. Grandidier is now with me, and bids me say nothing new has happened. She sends her love to Captain G --, and her respects to you. We have made you a few biscuits to relish a glass of wine; and I beg leave to propose the toast -- "05 we have in our arms, whom we love in our hearts."By any accounts we have as yet, there seems to be little hopes of seeing you soon; we beg therefore, that if there be any thing that we could send that would make your situation more comfortable, you will let us know. Mr. McS -- has voluntarily become my agent to find me opportunities, and see any thing I send put on board, or whatever business I may have for him to do. I am going to write a few lines to Mr. A --, begging, when he has an opportunity for this place, and has no letter for me, that he will drop-- 78 --me a line communicating his last intelligence. If I can only hear that you are alive and well, it will be such a cordial to me, for O, at times, my heart forebodes such dreadful things. O, Doctor, but for the dear hope of having you one day restored to me, my life would be insupportable; how uncertain is that hope. Farewell, my love! may Heaven defend and protect you, praysYour fond and affectionate Wife,I. Graham