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Caroline Hyde Butler LaingEdward ButlerMy dear Edward,Sunday has come around again and with it I once more take my pen to write you. It is unfortunately a rainy Sunday, and of course the boys are thick, and as noisy as ducks after a shower. Sarah has gone to church with cloak and rubbers, while I am left to stem the torrent of teasing questions and answers. Edward at the present moment is busily engaged making paper lamplighters, and has filled a vase for me. Theodore has a broom sweeping up waste papers while Hunt Mills follows on with the shovel, to take up the said papers. The Mother of these fine youths is perfectly well, and most lovely to behold. I have only heard from you once, and I hope you will soon be here that I need not expect any more letters.-- 62 --Yesterday I heard from Ma' who says she will be home this week. I shall have her room ready for her. Yesterday I had the carpet taken up in my room and the room cleaned for the winter. I spent Thursday at Father's, they are all well, as also Hunt's family tho' I have not seen them since you left. I have an order for you. I find with all my economy and fixing up my old calico dresses I cannot make them do for the winter, as they are even now fast wearing out, so I think I must have a new one. My opinion is decidedly in favor of a good merino, which will last three winters, while a circassian which costs more than half as much, will only do for one. The color I should like would be a mazarine blue, which is dark, you know, and a belt to match, -- it will take five yards. I also want three pair worsted hose -- white and ribbed --. As to Sarah, she has outgrown her cloak entirely, it is not even soiled, but it will make her a capital dress; and I have my pongee, crepe colored, which will in turn make her a new cloak, and then with a circassian for everyday wear, she will do for the winter. -- Suppose you get Mrs. Wade to buy the merino, she will get it cheaper than you. 22You must calculate to be here on Thanksgiving Day, we are all invited to Father's. Do come, and make your visit as long as possible. Goodbye, my dear Edward, the children send love.Affectionately yours,Caroline. November 05, 1837 Northampton Edward Butler author {a}{}{R}{D}{L}{C}Letter from {author}Caroline Hyde Butler Laing{/author} to {recipient}Edward Butler{/recipient}, {date}November 05, 1837{/date}{location}Northampton{/location}, November 5th, 1837{content}My dear Edward,Sunday has come around again and with it I once more take my pen to write you. It is unfortunately a rainy Sunday, and of course the boys are thick, and as noisy as ducks after a shower. Sarah has gone to church with cloak and rubbers, while I am left to stem the torrent of teasing questions and answers. Edward at the present moment is busily engaged making paper lamplighters, and has filled a vase for me. Theodore has a broom sweeping up waste papers while Hunt Mills follows on with the shovel, to take up the said papers. The Mother of these fine youths is perfectly well, and most lovely to behold. I have only heard from you once, and I hope you will soon be here that I need not expect any more letters.-- 62 --Yesterday I heard from Ma' who says she will be home this week. I shall have her room ready for her. Yesterday I had the carpet taken up in my room and the room cleaned for the winter. I spent Thursday at Father's, they are all well, as also Hunt's family tho' I have not seen them since you left. I have an order for you. I find with all my economy and fixing up my old calico dresses I cannot make them do for the winter, as they are even now fast wearing out, so I think I must have a new one. My opinion is decidedly in favor of a good merino, which will last three winters, while a circassian which costs more than half as much, will only do for one. The color I should like would be a mazarine blue, which is dark, you know, and a belt to match, -- it will take five yards. I also want three pair worsted hose -- white and ribbed --. As to Sarah, she has outgrown her cloak entirely, it is not even soiled, but it will make her a capital dress; and I have my pongee, crepe colored, which will in turn make her a new cloak, and then with a circassian for everyday wear, she will do for the winter. -- Suppose you get Mrs. Wade to buy the merino, she will get it cheaper than you. 22You must calculate to be here on Thanksgiving Day, we are all invited to Father's. Do come, and make your visit as long as possible. Goodbye, my dear Edward, the children send love.Affectionately yours,Caroline.{/content}